Dave Bullock / eecue

photographer, director of engineering: crowdrise, photojournalist, hacker, nerd, geek, human

Blog

Getting Things Done and How It Changed My Life

Getting Things Done (GTD) literally changed my life 3 years ago. Growing up I had always been highly unorganized. After reading about GTD on the internet I ordered the book by David Allen and instantly started to change the way I worked.

GTD offers a pretty simple theory for organization: Collect every task and action you have in one trusted place. Instead of the dozens of lists I had spread throughout my computer for various projects, I funneled them all into several lists in one place. I collected every little nagging task my head and put them in those same lists.

Having all my actions in one place allowed me to easily keep track and review what I had to do. This simple change completely altered the way that I worked. I am now extremely productive and I love it.

A few weeks ago I reread GTD and implemented a number of things I had not done before. I created an orderly physical filing system for all my important papers. When I first started using GTD I tricked myself into thinking that I did everything on my computer. Once my filing system was setup I saw that was hardly the truth.

After creating my filing system I set up what David Allen calls a tickler file. A tickler file is a series of 43 folders, one for each month and 31 for each possible day of the month. When I have a physical item that requires my future attention I put it into either the month folder that it pertains to or the day if it happens to be in within the next 30 days. Every morning I check my tickler file to see if any paperwork is waiting for me.

Getting Things Done has change my life for the better. There is no way I could have accomplished what I have in the last 3 years without it. Thanks to GTD, I can finally say I truly am organized. Being organized is awesome.

Route 66 and Clouds

Route 66 stretches out into the desert near Ludlow in this photo I took after a Desert Explorers Rendezvous in 2007.

Blog

Photo Credit, Creative Commons and Those Who Ignore It

Scott Beale just posted about ZingFu ignoring his CC license and using one of his photos for a promotional card without either asking (which is required for commercial use) or crediting him. This happens to me rather frequently, which is why I've borrowed (with permission) the wording that Scott uses on all his photo on flickr:

This photo is licensed under a Creative Commons license. If you use this photo, please list the photo credit as "Scott Beale (Laughing Squid)" and link credit to laughingsquid.com.

Of course, I've replaced his name and website with mine, but I am guessing from his results, this will still not be enough.

The last two entities to refuse to properly credit my photos, and thus violate my creative commons license, were NPR and the Flickr Blog. I have also recently been contacted by an editor on Wikipedia, who has asked me to change my license to allow for commercial usage, which I will not do by any means. I find it very unfortunate that Wikipedia forbids -NC CC photos, but here is a page in support of their reasoning.

Copy of MAKE in The IT Crowd
Blog

MAKE Cameo in The IT Crowd

Copy of MAKE in The IT Crowd

I was watching the most recent episode of The IT Crowd, and I thought I spotted a copy of MAKE sitting on the desk in Roy's flat. I grabbed a screenshot and then compared it to my complete MAKE collection and it is clearly Volume 02 ofMAKE.

Blog

Some Like it Rude

I'm not sure if you will be able to stomach the language and brute humor on this website but to me the Rude Pundit is fucking hilarious.

Blog

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

Blog

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

Blog

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

Blog

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

Blog

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

Blog

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

Blog

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

Blog

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

Blog

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

This is a picture of a random bunny head that i have in my office. It was used in a world industries ad a few years back

Blog

AP Reports on Debate before it happens

The Daily show joked about this last night:

ABC news reports on "debate" that hasn't happened yet: "Mark Frauenfelder: The rules for tonight's poor-substitute-for-a-debate are so restrictive, and the sound-bites that will come out of the mouths of both men are so easy to guess, that ABC news was able to file a story about the results of the "debate" several hours before it takes place. Link Story removed by ABC, but you can find copies here. (Thanks, Certron!)"

Spin much AP?

(Via boing-boing.)

Blog

Boogah Tries Coke2, Likes It

from gominosensei:

i've finally gotten a hold of some c2 and i've gotta admit that it's nowhere near as bad as i thought it'd be. besides the occasional hint of artificial sweetener, it really seems like coke went thru the trouble of making c2 taste like regular coke. [read the rest at gomi no sensei]

Blog

my fink package made it into the tree!!!

link to the package

NetBIOS Auditing Tool Release
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As of February 16th Secure Networks Inc. has released a free (GPL`d)
NetBIOS auditing tool for use both on WindowsNT and UNIX platforms.
The tool itself is designed to test NetBIOS file-sharing configurations as
well as Password integrity of remote stations.

The toolset is available via the following channels:

ftp://ftp.secnet.com/pub/tools/nat10/nat10bin.zip (For NT and Win 95 binaries)
ftp://ftp.secnet.com/pub/tools/nat10/nat10.tgz (For full source)

http://www.secnet.com/ntinfo/ntaudit.html A technical description of how the NetBIOS auditing tool works follows.


The NetBIOS Auditing Tool (NAT) is designed to explore the NETBIOS file-sharing
services offered by the target system. It implements a stepwise approach to
gather information and attempt to obtain file system-level access as though
it were a legitimate local client.

The major steps are as follows:

A UDP status query is sent to the target, which usually elicits a reply
containing the Netbios "computer name". This is needed to establish a session.
The reply also can contain other information such as the workgroup and account
names of the machine`s users. This part of the program needs root privilege to
listen for replies on UDP port 137, since the reply is usually sent back to UDP
port 137 even if the original query came from some different port.

TCP connections are made to the target`s Netbios port [139], and session
requests using the derived computer name are sent across. Various guesses at
the computer name are also used, in case the status query failed or returned
incomplete information. If all such attempts to establish a session fail,
the host is assumed invulnerable to NETBIOS attacks even if TCP port 139 was
reachable.

Provided a connection is established Netbios "protocol levels" are now
negotiated across the new connection. This establishes various modes and
capabilities the client and server can use with each other, such as password
encryption and if the server uses user-level or share-level Security. The
usable protocol level is deliberately limited to LANMAN version 2 in this
case, since that protocol is somewhat simpler and uses a smaller password
keyspace than NT.

If the server requires further session setup to establish credentials, various
defaults are attempted. Completely blank usernames and passwords are often
allowed to set up "guest" connections to a server; if this fails then guesses
are tried using fairly standard account names such as ADMINISTRATOR, and some
of the names returned from the status query. Extensive username/password
checking is NOT done at this point, since the aim is just to get the session
established, but it should be noted that if this phase is reached at all MANY
more guesses can be attempted and likely without the owner of the target
being immediately aware of it.

Once the session is fully set up, transactions are performed to collect more
information about the server including any file system "shares" it offers.

Attempts are then made to connect to all listed file system shares and some
potentially unlisted ones. If the server requires passwords for the shares,
defaults are attempted as described above for session setup. Any successful
connections are then explored for writeability and some well-known file-naming
problems [the ".." class of bugs].

If a NETBIOS session can be established at all via TCP port 139, the target is
declared "vulnerable" with the remaining question being to what extent.
Information is collected under the appropriate vulnerability at most of
these steps, since any point along the way be blocked by the Security
configurations of the target. Most Microsoft-OS based servers and Unix SAMBA
will yield computer names and share lists, but not allow actual file-sharing
connections without a valid username and/or password. A remote connection to
a share is therefore a possibly serious Security problem, and a connection
that allows WRITING to the share almost certainly so. Printer and other
"device" services offered by the server are currently ignored.

For more information about NAT see:
http://www.secnet.com/ntinfo/ntaudit.html - Oliver Friedrichs

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Secure Networks Incorporated. Calgary, Alberta, Canada, (403) 262-9211